Bloomberg Law, Law360, and Quartz Articles Regarding Proposed Changes to H-1B Visa Lottery Feature RILG’s Eric Welsh

Eric Welsh was recently quoted in Genevieve Douglas’s Bloomberg Law article “H-1B Lottery Proposal Floats Higher Wage-Based Selections.” The article covers the Department of Homeland Security’s proposed change to the H-1B program, which would see the program shift from a random selection process to one based on applicant’s wages.

Eric offered his opinion on how the proposed change would affect American workers and employers.

“The current reform poses existential risks for the visa,” Eric Welsh, a partner with Reeves Immigration Law Group in Pasadena, Calif., said in emailed comments. “There is a legitimate interest in protecting jobs for American workers, but that is not served by cutting the number of visas available or raising the required wages and standards to unreasonable levels. Doing so may satisfy the short-term desire of incentivizing employers to stick to the domestic applicant pool, but long term, those businesses are not getting the ‘best and the brightest.’”

The full article can be found below.

H-1B Lottery Proposal Floats Higher Wage-Based Selections

Eric was also quoted in Suzanne Monyak’s Law360 article “Salary-Based H-1B Visas May Leave Out Foreign Grads.”

“We’re talking about really bright kids who are very ambitious, who are extremely hardworking, who are earning highly technical degrees,” said Eric R. Welsh, a partner at Reeves Immigration Law Group. “That, from my perspective, you would want in the workforce, you would want at your business.”

The full article can be found below. (Subscription required)

Salary-Based H-1B Visas May Leave Out Foreign Grads

Additionally, Eric was quoted in Ananya Bhattacharya’s Quartz India article “Can the H-1B visa survive American nationalism?”

Eric spoke about the downsides of lowering the number of H-1B visas permitted annually.

“If US businesses can’t recruit those highly qualified foreign workers, they are handicapped in the global market, and they will be providing inferior goods and services in the local market.”

The full article can be found below. (Subscription required)

Can the H-1B visa survive American nationalism?